Kirkby Ireleth St Cuthbert

Form 1A

(Rules 3.2 and 4.6)

Standard Information (parish churches etc.)

Kirkby Ireleth St Cuthbert
Carlisle Diocese Code: 7510
National Church Code: 607177
LB Unique ID: 75870
Postcode: Postcode for Satnav LA17 7TQ
In the hamlet of Beckside, within the village of Kirkby in Furness. Follow Parish Church signs from the A595 along Lady Moyra Incline. Kirkby in Furness is approximately 12 miles N of Barrow in Furness, 4 mile W of Ulverston by Kirkby Moor.
Carlisle
Kirkby Ireleth St Cuthbert
Kirkby Ireleth
Kirkby Ireleth
Furness

St Cuthbert’s Church is situated in the picturesque hamlet of Beckside in Kirkby in Furness, a rural coastal village in the south west of Cumbria.

St Cuthbert’s is a Grade II* building of high archaeological and historical significance and medium architectural and liturgical arrangement. The Carlisle Diocese Church Buildings Audit 2007 identifies its significance as giving the ‘general impression of a handsome and obviously ancient parish church’. The distinctive features include the ‘Norman features, including the doorway and stained glass. The timber screen, separating the Chancel and the nave, reflecting the design of the trusses’

C12
Yes
Grade II*
No
No
No
No
Spring flower display in the old churchyard surrounding the church outstanding including dog toothed violets.
-Picturesque
No
None
No
Yes
Yes
Churchyard surrounding church closed by SLDC.
Yes
Unknown
None
Craig & Green Architects
15/09/2011

An ancient church and its dedication may well reflect the flight west of the Monks from Lindisfarne, with the body of St Cuthbert, before the Danish invasion. The present church is believed to have been built by Roger de Kirby and there is a modern wooden plaque which shows the list of vicars from 1197. The original tower fell down in 1657 whilst the bells were being rung but was not replaced until 1829. The earliest parts of the church are of Norman origin, evident in the Norman arch of the south doorway, which is still one of the most striking images we can see today. In the north wall of the chancel there is also a deeply recessed Norman window but on the opposite wall, where one would expect to see another, only its outline remains following the 1884 Victorian restoration. There is even Norman stained glass in the south chancel window believed to represent the dying St Cuthbert. Two oak chests, cut from solid blocks, have been carbon dated and the timber is 2000 years old. There are a number of happy modern interventions including a 1950’s door with decorated panels.

None known.

Church and churchyards open to visitors.

Used for concerts, performances, displays, events.

Linda Dean
Church of England Reader
12/05/2017