Lamplugh - St Michael and All Angels

Form 1A

(Rules 3.2 and 4.6)

Standard Information (parish churches etc.)

Lamplugh - St Michael and All Angels
Carlisle Diocese Code: 4300
National Church Code: 607291
LB Unique ID: 76257
Grid Ref: NY 088208
Nestled in a beautiful setting with lakeland fells on one side and the coastal plain on the other.
Carlisle
Lamplugh - St Michael and All Angels
Lamplugh with Ennerdale
Lamplugh with Ennerdale
Calder
A chapel or church is believed to have been on the site since c1150; the present church was rebuilt in 1870 with some mediaeval features retained.
Yes
II*
No
No
No
No
The church is within a 'Landscape of County Importance' and its eastern boundary abuts the boundary of the Lake District National Park.
No
None
Yes
Yes
No
Yes
One WWI grave: J.E.Sewell, aged 19, (12.6.1918), and one WWII grave: J.Benn, aged 22, (4.11.1943).
War memorial, immediately to the west of the church, unveiled and consecrated in June 1921; inscribed with 30 names from WWI and 4 names from WWII.
John Barnes, JABA Architects Ltd; Renwick, Penrith CA10 1JZ
July 2018

St. Michael’s and its churchyard is in a rural setting, bounded by fields. It is located on a low rise at the northern end of a long narrow Parish. To the east, on the opposite side of the road which borders the southern and eastern churchyard walls, are Lake District fells providing a dramatic setting to the church. To the north, the distant coastal mountains of Dumfries and Galloway (Scotland) are often visible. The road is part of the ‘Coast to Coast’ route (‘C2C’) much used by cyclists and tourists in general. A church (or chapel) has existed on the site since c. 1150. Of the two bells one has been dated to the third quarter of the 15th century, probably made by famous bell founders in York and is on the national list of preserved bells. The other dates from 1870 and was cast by John Taylor and Co. of Loughborough. The famous Victorian architect William Butterfield (responsible, inter alia, for chapels at Rugby School, and at Keble and Balliol Colleges, Oxford, for churches, [for example], All Saints’, London, as well as cathedrals in Perth and Melbourne) was commissioned to design the present church (the only Butterfield church in Cumberland) which was re-dedicated and opened in 1870. Some mediaeval features were retained: a doorway in the north chancel wall (now blocked, though de-lineated externally by an 18th century monument), the re-modelled chancel and vestry (the latter with an original cusped window and door) and three gargoyles relocated to the external east wall. Pevsner claims that the Perpendicular style adopted by Butterfield is unusual for the date and must have reflected the earlier building. The walls are of sandstone with ashlar details; the roof is of slate. The stained glass is particularly fine. Two of the windows are by Charles Eamer Kempe (1891 and 1901) identified by the wheatsheaf trademark and two, subsequent to the death of Kempe, are from the Kempe –Tower workshop: ‘Kempe & Co. Ltd.’ (a director being C.E.Kempe’s cousin, Walter Tower) dated to 1910 and 1911 and identified by the crenellated tower placed within a wheatsheaf. Kempe's work can be found in twenty seven British cathedrals. Of the other four stained glass windows, one, dated 1903, is by Heaton Butler and Bayne of London and the other three are attributed to the London firm of Clayton and Bell (where C.E.Kempe originally studied. An Honours Board, which commemorates all those from the Parish who served in WWI, having been researched by the Lamplugh and District Heritage Society was erected by the Society in November 2018.

Earlier chapel/churches and burials

Has been the social centre of the scattered community for hundreds of years. Can now be considered as being of at least regional importance. Adjacent to the popular Coast to Coast (C2C) route and attracts visitors from around the country and from across the world.

St Michael's Lamplugh and its sister churches in the Parish are believed to be the first Anglican (Ecumenical) Churches in the country to have a Methodist Minister/Vicar.

Some concerts, coffee mornings / refreshments, sale of bric-a-brac etc; flower festival: the most recent being in August 2018 to celebrate the completion of the extensive repair works to the church. Separate wc facility provided by the PCC in 2013 adjacent to the churchyard gate for the use of church members and the community in general. The church is open every day

Significance could be compromised. The church lacks a kitchen or space for one and there are some access issues. The upgrading of the lighting undertaken in 2018 has enhanced the use of the church for holding concerts and hosting small exhibitions.

 

R.I. Megan
Churchwarden
15/01/2019